Wednesday, October 05, 2011

Very stretchy materials as armour

UnderArmour, Spandex, and very stretchy materials are NOT suitable as rapier armour and should not be included in the material tested with a drop tester to determine puncture resistance.  Feel free to wear them beneath your puncture resistant material.

Baroness Eyrny
Society Rapier Marshal

8 comments:

  1. I'm a stickler for how a statement is worded. This does not read as a new rule, but only as a suggestion because you say stretchy materials "SHOULD" not be included", instead of "they WILL" not be included". Others will probably also see this and put Marshals on the spot over the matter.

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  2. Define Stretchy. What is the criteria? How should we differentiate between very stretchy and mildly stretchy materials? Is there is way to do this that isn't just personal opinion or interpretation?

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  3. I would also be interested to know exactly what is considered underarmour? It is not hard to make puncture resistant armour to be worn under a shirt.

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  4. @Bart- I believe that the capitals indicate the brand name - UnderArmor (TM) - material that is light and stretchy and designed to wick away sweat without providing a substantial layer to increase heat, but is not designed as puncture resistant "Armor" for SCA use.

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  5. I agree that "very stretchy" is vague. UnderArmor and Spandex are both identifiable as a particular type of material that alone fits those words--however--"very stretchy" is going to become something that varies from marshal to marshal.

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  6. Just a thought ... I was going some testing of my own on some linen the other day. Some linen that I found required 4 layers to pass the test.

    However, if I put it at a single layer, and a typical hanes t-shirt below it. Not 'very stretchy' material like spandex, just t-shirt. It would pass by the letter of the law, because while the top layer only would be penetrated (boom, gone) ... the tshirt material would stretch enough to hold the probe firm without penetration.

    So it would pass, by the letter of the law. Only the 'top layer' of 2 was penetrated.

    But obviously, a hanes t-shirt isn't going to really stop a broken blade from penetrating.

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  7. Siegfried, have you *run* the drop test with the t-shirt and linen and had these results, or are you hypothesizing?

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  8. Another way UnderArmor is classified is "technical shirt" material.

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